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:: Red Forest Woodsman :: by HundredHands :: Red Forest Woodsman :: by HundredHands
Named for the Redwood Forests where I grew up in Santa Cruz County, Northern California. I started this knife a year ago and didn't finish until last week. I didn't keep track of how many hours went into it.
It's production was interrupted last August when I was the victim of a hit-and-run while riding my bike. I broke my knee, my hip, dislocated my right femur, and severed a tendon in my right quad. Needless to say, knifemaking took a back-seat for about 6 months while I relearned how to walk and stuff.

The Tenth Knife of my apprenticeship to KnifeMaker, Larry Detloff of Santa Cruz, California.

Blade length: 4.125"
Overall length (open): 9"

Damascus Steel folded by Mike Norris.

Blade: Stainless Damascus (Vortex pattern)
Bolsters: 440c stainless steel
Liners: titanium
Scale: Amboyna
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:iconknighttemplar13oct13:
Gorgeous in every way!!! .....  And useful.
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:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner Jul 29, 2014  Professional Artisan Crafter
Thank you!  I'm glad you like it ^_^
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:iconaahneus:
Aahneus Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2014  Professional Writer
Stunning.
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:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner Apr 1, 2014  Professional Artisan Crafter
Thank you.
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:iconking-o-fools:
King-o-Fools Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I love how the blade looks like a topographical map. Fit the "woodsman" name you gave it.
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:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner Mar 16, 2014  Professional Artisan Crafter
Thank you.
It's great steel to work with.
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:icongarystearly:
GaryStearly Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
really nice.
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:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2014  Professional Artisan Crafter
Thank you.
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:iconxeppe:
Xeppe Featured By Owner Dec 12, 2013
That is honestly one of the most beautifull folding knives I ever came across! I tip my hat to you sir!
One question: I tried making a knife once (Saex), just improvised it - I don't have much experience with tools/metalworking. Overall it came out OK but I found it incredibly hard to give it an edge and to make it taper it thin ebough. I used a grinding wheel and it took forever to take material away. Is there difference in those stones like with sanding paper or did I perhaps bought steel that was just too hard?
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:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner Dec 14, 2013  Professional Artisan Crafter
Thanks Kenny!

Putting a keen edge on a piece of steel takes practice, subtle variations in your grinding angle will greatly effect the knife's sharpness and ability to hold an edge.  I also use wheels, a simple silica carbide wheel does a lot of the work and some rubberized-grit wheels (called Cratex) for clean up and refining, & yeah work can be slow going. Still, it's possible that it was the steel or the wheel.  All that besides, great job taking the hands-on approach to experimenting with knife making.

I hope you're well.
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:iconxeppe:
Xeppe Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2013
Cool, thanks for the explanation! I might give it another try this summer :-)
Best of luck to you and I look forward seeing more of your work!
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:iconarietzor:
Arietzor Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Nice one!!!=);):)
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:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2013  Professional Artisan Crafter
Glad you like it ^_^
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:iconarietzor:
Arietzor Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
thanks for sharing!!!Clap
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:iconnobleknives:
NobleKnives Featured By Owner Jun 25, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Wow i wish my 10th knife looked that good
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:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner Jun 25, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
Kind words, thanks.
All your work is insane-o accurate. Are you milling with CNC and stuff? I'm loving your blade grinds and profile designs. Your Wraith looks very technical.
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:iconnobleknives:
NobleKnives Featured By Owner Jun 26, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
well your work looks the same, i have only made about 60 knives so even tho ive been at it for a few years im still actually pretty new to it in the experiance leve. i dont use any kind of CNC or Mill my work shop is nothing more than a 2x72 belt grinder and a couple of drill presses and a vertical and horizontal pipe cutting band saw and a buffer and a bunch of files and hand tools, i personally pride my self on keeping as low tech as possible how ever the Wraith Model is the only folder i have made and i used a mill non CNC to ream the holes and cut the liner lock and counter bore for the bearing system other than that its all freehand on a grinder and hand finishing.Your designs are killer as well i wish i could mate scales and bolsters together like that i have to keep everything straight lines becaise i can never seem to match the curves.
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:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner Jun 29, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
I'm relatively new to knifemaking as well. It's wonderful how much one can achieve with a pretty humble shop, mine is similar though I'm doing my grinding with wheels instead of belts. I applaud your focus on keeping your production low tech. I'm amazed by how uniform you're able to keep your work without CNC! Well done. I've reused templates of mine but even then my knives end up looking really different from eachother when viewed side by side.

When I match grind with different materials butted up to one another, I try to get the harder material (usually metal for a bolster) into roughly the right shape first then place the softer material (usually wood for the scale) and just gently grind away at the wood to bring it flush. It cuts really fast though so heads-up!
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:iconnobleknives:
NobleKnives Featured By Owner Jun 29, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
yeah i have been doing it for years but as a hobby im just so slow, but i keep it so clean by taking my time and not trying to do tomuch work on the grinder or other power tools and then use a ton of sand paper to do alot of hand finishing


yeah i have tryed that but always end up with big gaps in the mated surfaces
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:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner Jun 30, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
The Tortoise and the Hare. ^_^
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:iconnobleknives:
NobleKnives Featured By Owner Jul 1, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Lol yeah
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:iconou8nrtist2:
ou8nrtist2 Featured By Owner May 1, 2012  Professional
I've been watching a few of your posts and I think you have a great natural strength in overall composition of your pieces.
Are you not technically a hilt maker at this point,since I've seen no blades you've forged as of yet?
In your apprenticeship he has you starting on the assembly and forging blades comes later?
One other question,is there a practical reason for the obtuse angle on the cutting edge instead of a smooth curve?
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:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner May 1, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
Thank you, I'm glad that the overall composition of the knives works for you. I don't forge, neither does my Master. This practice is specifically the crafting of custom, hand-made, folding knives. For me, the more challenging aspect of this process is in designing, hand-crafting and fitting the mechanical elements, making it work, lock, break-down and stuff. It's really fun to play with the 2-phase design also, making it work aesthetically while both opened and closed. All the grinding is done free-hand on wheels so there's no CAD, CNC, or milling in this style of working either. Mechanical details are tuned using needle files and stuff which makes it that much more satisfying to get all the mechanics walking-and-talking.

The angle you mention is where the grind switches from hollow-ground on the edge (for cutting) to convex on the point to lend strength for piercing.

Thanks for all the interest!
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:iconou8nrtist2:
ou8nrtist2 Featured By Owner May 1, 2012  Professional
Your compositions are beautiful to be sure,and quite unique i think.
I assumed there was a reason for the angle on the blade though I could not see it in the photo...
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:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner May 1, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
I apologize for the quality of my pictures (lighting, focus, etc.).
I have a very long way to go as a photographer.

Would you actually have any advice for a person like me who is taking pictures of objects that are often smallish and pretty reflective? I know you've been at it for a while. Thanks.
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:iconou8nrtist2:
ou8nrtist2 Featured By Owner May 1, 2012  Professional
No apologies necessary friend,
The shots are not bad at all,especially for getting peoples attention.but the challenge is you are dealing with a highly specialized niche market and I would bet generally speaking,the folks you are selling to are highly informed and want to see the intricate details.Seems to me multiple angles at this point may be the only way though I can definitely suggest some tricks.
If you can get a piece of frosted glass,shoot OUTSIDE with natural light and bounce some ambient light up from underneath ,it may illuminate some of the fine details you'd like your potential customers to see...
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:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner May 1, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
That is an excellent suggestion. I've been struggling with shadows and stuff, frosted glass is a great call.
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:iconou8nrtist2:
ou8nrtist2 Featured By Owner May 1, 2012  Professional
Here's an example of how it can help sometimes.The homogenous background does not compete with the subject.[link]
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:iconou8nrtist2:
ou8nrtist2 Featured By Owner May 2, 2012  Professional
Here's a better example.
Without the diffuse light provided by the frosted glass many of the details would be lost or in shadow...
[link]
Reply
:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner May 2, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
Thank you, wow, that photo came out great and really showcases the work. I love the knot pattern! Well done.

The image is really crisp, Are you managing your focus manually for this stuff? I'm using a pretty simple little point and click camera right now, and have trouble sometimes with the focus especially shooting at small things. Thanks again for taking the time. You are helping me a lot!
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(1 Reply)
:icondreamingdragondesign:
DreamingDragonDesign Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
This is a really nice design. One question, since I know more than a little about knives (can explain in a note if you want to know) and their design: is the blade a little wider at the tip, or is that an optical illusion in the photo?
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:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
The tip is a little fatter and tapers at a convex angle. The cutting edge is hollow ground, concave. Good eye picking that up from this picture. The facets of the blade grind are really obscured when the blade's etched to bring out the pattern in the damascus. The photography tactics you've taught me are helping me find ways to capture the subtleties in the facets of the blade grind using angles and reflection :)
Thanks again for that!
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:icondreamingdragondesign:
DreamingDragonDesign Featured By Owner Apr 14, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
:) You're welcome. I'm glad my photo advice is helping.

Ignore this next part if you hate criticism about blades, as this is offered only to help, not to piss you off.

You might want to avoid allowing the spine to taper behind the tip like that when you start making knives for sale.
Customers are not always as smart, restrained or responsible as we would like them to be, and if someone pries something open with this blade it can put a LOT of stress on the thin spot. A better option (IMHO) is to keep the spine at an even taper, as this forms a supportive backbone without weakness, allowing you to do all kinds of neat things with the rest of the grind.
Is it idiotic to pry with a folding knife, especially an expensive handcrafted one? Of course. But money doesn't indicate intelligence, and sometime people give custom blades as gifts to people who have no concept of what they've been given. Remember, it doesn't matter how dumb the customer is, your makers mark is still on it, and people will nearly always nitpick the maker for a blade failure first, even if the damage is clearly the fault of the user.
Reply
:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
Ha ha, Yeah, it's funny that someone would try to use a folder as a crowbar then be surprised that it was damaged in the process. Don't worry about offending me, I'm grateful for your input so thanks for weighing in!

The grind I'm using on this woodsman design is actually full billet width at the top of the hollow grind of the cutting edge, then tapers a bit as you continue up towards the false edge on the back of the blade. So don't worry, it doesn't actually get skinnier in the middle. If a client tried to pry their car door off with this thing, the weak link in the chain would most certainly be in the hinge/lock mechanism. Man, I hope nobody attempts that:)

Thanks again for the heads-up. If you don't mind my asking, what actually is your background with knives? I appreciate your insight.
Reply
:icondreamingdragondesign:
DreamingDragonDesign Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
Note me about the knife thing. It's been requested that I don't currently brag about it in public on DA. *roll eyes*

Ah, if that's a false edge then it's all good.
I do know of a guy who got locked out of his Jeep while hunting, 50 miles from help in the winter in Colorado, with night approaching fast. He cut a hole in the door of his car to get it unlocked, using a custom hunting knife.
Admittedly, I still don't know why he didn't break the window, except that it was really cold and snowing. But I'm guessing it was also expensive to fix the Jeep.
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:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
Note is enroute.

The old "can-opener" method eh? I definitely must be missing something if he ended up choosing that as his most practical option. Glad to hear that he was able to avoid getting stuck out in the cold though.
Reply
:icondanielapierce:
DanielAPierce Featured By Owner Mar 4, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
Dang dude... what do you want for that knife!!!!?
That's Bad. Top of The Line Bad. hahah.
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:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
Thanks Daniel! That's high praise coming from you. My knife production is so slow, I'm envious of how proficient you're able to be with your knapping. You produce like crazy!
Unfortunately this knife was made as a gift for a friend so it's not available for trade.
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:icondanielapierce:
DanielAPierce Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
(p.s - I was just about to write on your page)

But dang, yeah that's a really really beautiful
knife. If ever one day I'd like to own one of
your pieces, very truly would. I don't carry much
knives around, even own any but this one or one
like it I'd very much like to have in my mist's.
Reply
:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
Thanks Dan, I'm glad you're that into them. I actually don't carry one of my own knives either. I wear a Banchmade for everyday use. So much goes into the custom folders that even though they'll cut great, they end up being sort of more ceremonial. Gifts for elders, tokens of respect, that sort of thing. I imagine your work being like that also, no?
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:icondanielapierce:
DanielAPierce Featured By Owner Mar 7, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
I'm serious 100 whenever you get back into action I want to get one of these bad boys!! Custom Made. YEssssSSsss. They got a dude out there who makes folding knapped blades. I almost flipped when I seen it. One was obsidian, maybe chert or agate. Nice lookin.

Ya pretty much I mean you can use these knives, my knives but realistically you don't actually need to with so many steel knives at hand but theres far in few who make them and are a nice thing to have, they look good. hhah
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:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
Folding knapped Blades? Insane. Got a link for that?
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:icondanielapierce:
DanielAPierce Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
Man I don't even know. I just tried looking for it, nothing. I may saved a picture of it, I'll look at let you know.
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:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner Mar 9, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
Thank you:)
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:iconvtglassartist:
vtglassartist Featured By Owner Mar 4, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Beautiful work!
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:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner Mar 6, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
Thank you.
Reply
:iconcameronlang95:
CameronLang95 Featured By Owner Mar 2, 2012
beautiful work, i love the blade. i just wish apprenticeships were available in Manitoba
-valyaris: its called damascus steel, do some research its a really interesting process
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:iconhundredhands:
HundredHands Featured By Owner Mar 4, 2012  Professional Artisan Crafter
Thanks, I'm glad it works for you. I'll keep my fingers crossed in hopes that you cross paths with someone able to take on a student. Keep up your search!:)
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:iconvalyaris:
Valyaris Featured By Owner Feb 29, 2012
WoW! How is that pattern made? I'm into smithing too, but I'm a newbie.
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:iconaperture64:
Aperture64 Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Amazing work.
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